rose shaped macarons: inspired by portmeirion botanic garden.

Rose effect macaron recipes

Inspired by nature, the Portmeirion Botanic Garden collection is full of floral flourishes from foxgloves to fuchsias and poppies to peonies. Founder Susan Williams-Ellis created the Botanic Garden range which has been synonymous with the brand since its inception, preferring the delicate pottery pieces to be mixed and matched rather like a British garden would. A quaint hydrangea print teapot can sit alongside sweet pea teacups and a stack of cakes on a iris print plate; each colour, shade and design harmonising against one another.

To celebrate what would have been her 100th birthday (June 6th 2018), I've teamed up with Portmeirion to create some botanical inspired creations of my own. These rose inspired macarons are made with a two tone petal effect, given a fondant green leaf and filled with vanilla and strawberry buttercream. An ode to Susan, I'd like to hope she would have been happy to have them at her afternoon tea party.



Shopping list.
(Make 24 rose shaped macarons)
♥ Two egg whites, at room temperature
♥ 75g caster sugar
♥ 100g icing sugar, sieved
♥ 80g almonds, sieved until fine with lumps discarded
♥ A mix of food colouring; I used Sugarflair Pink and Scarlet Red

For the vanilla and strawberry buttercream filling 
♥ 100g butter, softened 
♥ 200g icing sugar 
♥ 1 tsp vanilla essence 
♥ 2 tsp freeze dried strawberries

For the decoration 
♥ Fondant icing 
♥ Green food colouring, such as Sugarflair Spruce Green

Equipment
♥ Baking sheet
♥ 24 circle silicone macaron mat (or baking parchment with circles guides drawn on)
♥ Piping bags
♥ Sieve 
♥ A flat tip icing nozzle
♥ Leaf shaped fondant cutter

Step one. Make your macarons according to the below macaron recipe guide. The difference is that this recipe uses slightly more icing sugar and ground almonds to make an extra sturdy mix that will keep the petal definition.

Step two. Place the flat tip nozzle at the end of your piping bag; again this is different to the usual recipe as it is to help with the rose effect. 

Step three. Using a blunt knife or chopstick, add lines of food colouring inside the bag, to eventually create the two tone effect. Add your macaron mix to the bag and secure with an elastic band or knot.


Step four. Pipe in swirls and alternative directions to create a randomised "rose" head effect. Allow to dry for 15 minutes before baking for 15 minutes.

Step five. Meanwhile make your buttercream filling by whisking together the frosting ingredients. If you'd like your roses to have leaves, make these from the green fondant here too.


Step six. When your macarons are completely cool, pipe the buttercream, add a leaf and twist to create a full macaron.



Have you ever made rose effect or rose shape macarons? What are your favourite novelty macaron recipes? Share your #PortmeirionMoments on Instagram or see how else Portmeirion are celebrating Susan's birthday over on the Twitter hashtag #SWE100.



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In collaboration with Portmeirion

3 comments:

  1. These look super beautiful.

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  2. Your rose macarons or simply stunning, what a wonderful tribute to Susan Williams-Ellis:-)

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  3. Certainly an interesting concept, never thought I would see rose shaped macarons!

    ReplyDelete